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1963 Topps Pete Rose Rookie Card: A Closer Look

rose-rookiePete Rose was the epitome of hard-nosed baseball players. ‘Charlie Hustle’ earned his nickname for his tenacity on the field and his prowess at the plate.

Despite being banished from baseball due to gambling on games, Rose remains one of the most well-respected players of all time. 

And while Rose will never likely reach the Hall Of Fame, his 1963 Topps Rookie card remains one of the hobby’s most valuable cards

The Rose rookie card has always been one of my favorite baseball cards. I love the bright colors of the 1963 Topps set, and Rose’s tiny circular rookie headshot makes for one awesome-looking card.

Rose’s rookie has continued to appreciate in value as collectors and investors alike bid up high-grade copies. Ultimately, I still think despite the above-average supply, Rose’s rookie in higher grades remains an excellent investment.

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1948 Bowman Baseball Cards: Most Valuable (Top Picks)

1948-bowman-musialThe 1948 Bowman Baseball set is one of the more important baseball card issues in the history of the hobby.

It represents the first baseball card issue for Bowman, and the first baseball cards released following a seven-year hiatus of card issues post World War II. 

Bowman would go on to have a short-lived monopoly in the baseball card market, lasting from 1948 through 1951, ultimately ending when Topps came to town in 1952.

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1959 Topps Bob Gibson Rookie Card: A Closer Look

gibson-rcFew pitchers in MLB history were as dominating on the mound as Hall-of-Fame pitcher Bob Gibson.

Gibson’s fastball helped him break records while winning two World Series Championships (1964 & 1967) with the St Louis Cardinals.

Despite Gibson’s dominance over his 17-year career, his 1959 Topps rookie card has been a bit underappreciated by collectors.

However, over the last few years, his rookie card has exploded in value, as the hobby has finally recognized the legend of Gibson.

In this piece, I’ll examine the population reports for Gibson’s rookie card, current values, and take a look at his career, while providing thoughts on the future investment value for his 1959 Topps card.

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1965 Topps Joe Namath Rookie Card: A Closer Look

Joe Namath is one of the most famous quarterbacks in NFL history. He was a quarterback for the New York Jets and played college football at Alabama. His career lasted from 1965 to 1977, before he retired due to health issues.

Namath’s 1965 Topps Football card is his rookie card and one of the most iconic and valuable cards in the hobby. Mint condition copies have sold for over $200,000 as vintage collectors continue to gravitate to the cards of ‘Broadway Joe’. 

As follows, we’ll examine the population reports for Namath’s rookie card, current values, and take a look at his career, while providing thoughts on the future investment value for the card.

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Topps Dynasty Is Over: Does Fanatics Stand A Chance?

In what came as a shock to many, MLB and the MLBPA (MLB Players Association) signed a new exclusive deal with sports memorabilia company Fanatics, effectively ending the near 70-year dynasty for Topps.

The immediate reaction from collectors?

Surprise, confusion, and outrage.

Keith Olbermann, not afraid to speak his mind, said the deal orchestrated by the ‘Butcher Of Baseball’ (aka Rob Manfred, head of MLBPA) will lead to ‘ Shit Propagandist Cards’ due to  MLB’s involvement as an equity partner in the deal.

While Topps won’t win any awards for the junk-era designs and overproduction during the ’80s, the brand represents a certain nostalgia for many in the hobby that crosses generations.

And the fear is that Fanatics will flip the industry upside down, leaving the hobby in a state of disarray.

I’ve had a few days to digest this and had a lot of questions from collectors. Here’s a summary of my thoughts and answers to some of the biggest uncertainties regarding the deal.

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1950 Bowman Baseball Cards: Most Valuable (Top Picks)

50-bowman-robinsonThe early Spring of 1950 brought the release of Bowman Baseball Cards to local neighborhood corner stores. 

As kids ripped into new packs, a surprise awaited; beautiful full-color cards, a big improvement over the monochrome colors used in the 1949 Bowman issue.

The beautifully painted images in the 252 card set boast a mix of breathtaking ballpark backgrounds, action shots, and classic portrait photos. 

The thin white border leads the collector’s eye to focus on the brilliance of the artistry, a simplicity that makes it one of my favorite baseball sets

Like the 48 and 49 Bowman cards that preceded it, the cards are a smaller size (2 ⅙  x 2 ½), which was the norm, until Topps rolled into town in 1952 with larger size cards.

A few stars of the day are notably absent from the set, both Stan “The Man” Musial and Joe DiMaggio are glaring omissions. Neither had signed contracts with Bowman. (Note, however, that Joe’s brother Dom is a part of the set)

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HOF Cards From The Forgotten Yankees & Athletics Rivalry

1932-caramel-ruthAs the prosperous days of the Roaring Twenties inched toward conclusion, baseball fans were gifted with an all-time rivalry that played out over a 4-year period from 1927-1930.

It was almost like a final treat to Americans before they would be wreaked havoc upon by the Great Depression that loomed just around the corner after the conclusion of the 1929 World Series.

It was an interesting period for America’s Pastime. Most major cities on the east coast had two professional teams, between the AL and NL, because baseball had not yet garnered as much popularity in the west.

However, these four years saw one of the earliest battles between two teams who were in a quest to become major leagues’ supreme club at the time. 

It was a rivalry between the Philadelphia Athletics and the New York Yankees

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Building The 1986 Fleer Basketball Set: A Collector’s Guide

jordan-rookie-psa-6One of my collecting buddies and I were recently discussing his quest to build a 1986 Fleer Basketball set.

Something that is not an easy feat, especially with the significant increase in values across the board on 86 Fleer Basketball cards.

While Jordan rookies have experienced a bit of a dip of late, I think all collectors could use a few tips in piecing together the set.  

Thus, here is his guide for collectors looking to build the 1986 Fleer set.  

Have anything you might add to the discussion?

Feel free to add any comments below!

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1950 Toleteros Joshua Gibson: The Real Holy Grail?

josh-toleteros-gibsonFor me, there’s no more intriguing baseball issue than the Josh Gibson 1950-51 Toleteros card.

Donned as the “Black” Babe Ruth, Josh Gibson is widely believed to be the greatest player never to play in the major leagues.

Owners of the professional baseball teams at the time refused to hire black players.

Although the recording of statistics during the negro league era is perceived as tenuous, Gibson’s talent on the diamond was seen in the exact opposite light; his talent was utterly undeniable.

In this piece, I’ll take a closer look at the career of Josh Gibson and his Toleteros baseball card.

I also argue that Gibson’s card might just be the true ‘Holy Grail’.

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The Baseball Card Sets Of The 1940s

41-playball-tedThe 1940s saw a rather sparse issuance of baseball cards, with seven major sets produced.

Card production in the early 1940s was quite slow, which some blame on the lack of supplies (particularly paper and gum). However, things started to return to more normalcy in 1948, following the end of World War II.  

Although there were fewer sets produced in the 1940s, the era still produced some of the most beautiful sports cards of all time. And some, in my opinion, represent the most important cards in the hobby.

I will cover each set by discussing player and set specifics and fun facts for cards; going over the top cards from each set; critiquing set and card aesthetics, and commenting on recent market values for certain cards and grades using PSA’s population reports.

What’s your favorite set from the 1940s?  Let me know in the comment section below.

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